On the Fifth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

7-day Period of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew:

Last Day of National Mourning for Harry Lee Kuan Yew – State Funeral Procession

On the Sixth day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew, and the Wilful Blindness of Man

On the Fifth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Fourth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Third Day of National Mourning: Long Snaking Queues to Pay Last Respects to Lee Kuan Yew

On the Third Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Second Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Farewell and Good Night, Harry Lee Kuan Yew – 7 Reasons for Respecting LKY

Friday evening. The last night to join the long queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House.

long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, SingaporeAt about 10.45p.m. at City Hall MRT, Exit B was closed off to people coming to the Padang. The Priority Queue (for the elderly, disabled, people with young children) was still starting from the vicinity of the steps of the old City Hall building. The normal queue started at Exit A, just outside Starbucks and McDonalds in Raffles City.

long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, SingaporeNever have I seen such sustained crowding – not on any National Day, not when the IT Fairs were on, not at Christmas or New Year or Chinese New Year.

The lady holding the waiting time board, not finding anywhere to stand, was perched on the MRT parapet. “10 hours” it read:

long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

At about 11p.m., the queue was temporarily suspended for the safety of the crowd. Fortunately, there wasn’t any pushing that might lead to the horrific stampede that killed many in Shanghai over the New Year.

long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore“Please do not join the queue. The Padang is full!” yelled this policeman into a megaphone, but the crowds were still arriving.

Check:

Remembering Lee Kuan Yew – Lying in State at Parliament House for up-to-date details

And here in true Singapore form is a live telecast of the room in which LKY is lying in state:

We felt no fear at the crowds; just amazement at the sheer number of people who would wait through the night to demonstrate their gratitude to this man. And somehow, sweating it out in solidarity with fellow Singaporeans and sympathetic visitors seemed a form of catharsis.

Loved how people commemorated Ah Kong (grandfather) in their own way, demonstrating the rarely-seen diversity of Singaporeans: the Singapore Botanic Gardens named a new orchid breed after him (Aranda Lee Kuan Yew (李光耀蜻蜓万代兰)), Teo Ser Luck dedicated a new work out to him, and Christopher Pereira made figurines which he put on display outside Raffles City: Christopher Pereira (Chris Treewizard) and his LKY dolls and figurines,  past the long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Christopher Pereira (Chris Treewizard) and his LKY dolls and figurines, past the long queues to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew lying in state at Parliament House, SingaporeIs all this idolatry? Well, Paul the apostle who spoke out strongly against the worship of anything other than Son of God himself had this to say:

Pay to all what is owed to them: taxes to whom taxes are owed, revenue to whom revenue is owed, respect to whom respect is owed, honour to whom honour is owed. (Romans 13:7)

And as I read more about the man I never bothered to know other than the “authoritarian”, “dictatorial” prime minister, senior minister, minister mentor others said he was, I understood that respect and honour was due to him.

As a “global statesman” he did not try to be the star of the show, instead he had only one interest – the good of Singapore. What a wonderful thing to say about any person, not to say any politician!

First of all, I learnt not to be ashamed to be a patriot. To the young, as I then was, the term carries a vague, undefinable whiff of unfashionable mustiness. But to serve the Republic of Singapore in any capacity is no mean profession because if Singapore does not survive, no other value can be realised in this vale of tears we call the world.

You may think that all diplomats or all statesmen must obviously serve their own countries’ interests. Well, they certainly ought to. But as I grew more experienced in the craft of diplomacy, I observed that this was all too often the exception rather than the rule; that too many leaders and diplomats, from too many countries, too often confuse personal interests with national interests, or convince themselves that these are synonymous. There is no creature more susceptible to self-deception than certain types of diplomats or erstwhile statesmen. The worst types believe that whatever they do is necessarily important simply because they do it – they and no one else, because, of course, they are the centre of the universe. Mr Lee was never like that. He is often described as a global statesman, and so he was. But I doubt Mr Lee ever set much store by that appellation or any of the many formal honours he was given by foreign countries. These were means, not ends. His laser-like focus – his “universe” if you like – was always Singapore. He operated on a global stage, but only for Singapore. He won many friends and was personally greatly admired around the world. But this was always deployed for Singapore. He spoke his mind and never hesitated to do what necessity dictated for Singapore’s interests, even if it put his personal friendships at risk.

Second, I learnt that the pursuit and defence of Singapore’s interests must be grounded in a clinical and clear-eyed, indeed cold-blooded and intellectually ruthless, understanding of the environment in which a small country operates. Small countries cannot afford illusions. Mr Lee never mistook the necessary politesse and hypocrisies of statecraft and diplomacy for reality. He took as the starting point the world as it is; a world as full of promise and opportunity but a world also inevitably flawed and, so, often perilous. Mr Lee invariably cut through all the fluff that usually conceals the hard realities of international relations. He zeroed in on the very core of any issue or situation. His analysis was always holistic, enriched and given depth and breadth by his realistic understanding of history, of different cultures and, ultimately, of human nature in all its rich variety. He pursued what was possible in practice, not what was desirable on principle. He wanted to get things done. He always dared to try – Singapore would not exist otherwise – but was not given to chasing chimeras. This is again rarer than one might expect. Mr Lee never stopped learning and was never too proud to seek information even from the most junior, and certainly never too proud to change his mind whenever the situation warranted.

Third, I learnt no leader, however talented, can achieve much alone. Mr Lee was undoubtedly a great leader, but he was the great leader of a great team and of a great people. Leadership is not a matter of intellect alone. His sense of mission, his dedication to and passion for Singapore inspired an entire generation of Singaporeans from all walks of life to defy the odds and to serve some cause larger than themselves.
(Bilahari Kausikan, Mr Lee Kuan Yew was ‘a complex man who evoked many emotions’, Straits Times, 27 March 2015)

As a prime minister, his government was remarkable not for oppression, but for using democratic institutions to ensure there would be no oppression:

But the Singapore model, as China’s rulers understand it, never existed. To emulate Lee’s model of government – rather than its cartoon caricature – would require allowing a far more democratic system than the CCP would ever tolerate.

The true secret of Lee’s political genius was not his skillful use of repressive practices, such as launching lawsuits against the media or his political opponents; such tactics are common and unremarkable in semi-authoritarian regimes. What Lee did that was truly revolutionary was to use democratic institutions and the rule of law to curb the predatory appetite of his country’s ruling elite.


By holding regular competitive elections, Lee effectively established a mechanism of political self-enforcement and accountability – he gave Singaporean voters the power to decide whether the PAP should stay in power. This enforcement mechanism has maintained discipline within Singapore’s ruling elite and makes its promises credible.

Regrettably, most of the rest of the world has never given Lee proper credit for crafting a hybrid system of authoritarianism and democracy that vastly improved the wellbeing of his country’s citizens, without subjecting them to the brutality and oppression to which many of Singapore’s neighbors have resorted.
(Minxin Pei, The Real Singapore Model, Project Syndicate 26 March 2015)

As an elected member of parliament, he was more interested in what was right for the country, rather than being popular with the people:

We in Government and as MPs on the ground know how difficult it is to carry unpopular policies, even if they are right. Why did Mr Lee and his Government choose to persuade Singaporeans to do, again and again, what was necessary but painful? Mr Lee himself provided us the answer. He said in 1968 in this House ‘If we were a soft community, then the temptation would be to leave things alone and hope for the best. Then, only good fortune can save us from the unpleasantness which reason and logic tell us is ahead of us. But we are not an easy-going people. We cannot help thinking, calculating and planning for tomorrow, for next week, for next month, for next year, for the next generation. And it is because we have restless minds, forever probing and testing, seeking new and better solutions to old and new problems, that we have never been, and I trust never shall be, tried and found wanting.’

“Mr Lee refused to be swayed by ideology that could not work. He dubbed these as ‘highfalutin ideas that misled Singaporeans’. (‘A nation cries out in mourning’: Dr Ng Eng Hen on Lee Kuan Yew, Channel NewsAsia, 26 March 2015)

On the Fourth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

7-day Period of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew:

Last Day of National Mourning for Harry Lee Kuan Yew – State Funeral Procession

On the Sixth day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew, and the Wilful Blindness of Man

On the Fifth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Fourth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Third Day of National Mourning: Long Snaking Queues to Pay Last Respects to Lee Kuan Yew

On the Third Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Second Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Farewell and Good Night, Harry Lee Kuan Yew – 7 Reasons for Respecting LKY

On the 4th day of national mourning for Lee Kuan Yew, after MRT and LRT trains and some buses ran all night, the crowds cleared a little. We got to City Hall MRT, took Exit B to emerge outside St. Andrew’s Cathedral. There, those for the priority queue (frail, elderly, special needs) turned left and headed to the steps of the old City Hall, while the rest of us turned right and skirted the other side of St. Andrew’s Cathedral.

Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Water was handed out and there were clean portaloos. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

There was a last chance to get to the priority queue.”Oh! Me, me!” yelled the white-haired man in front of me as he sprinted forward with remarkable agility, to the amusement of the crowd. No one begrudged him his technical right. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

From there, there were snaking queues on the Padang, where the hardworking army boys had set up tents. The queues were efficiently run, though of course, people weren’t always around to stop queue jumpers.

Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

Then across to the Cenotaph at Esplanade Park, along the leafy Connaught Drive where we had a good view of the new Downtown Core and magnificent Marina Bay Sands. More water was available, as were clean portaloos.

“Please take water and drink. Take care of yourself. Very hot, don’t dehydrate.” Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

We shook hands with (and here I had to check against the composite photos of MPs, ignoramus that I am) Teo Chee Hean and Tharman Shamugaratnam and Halimah Yacob, who thanked us for our patience and for coming. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

Past Victoria Memorial Hall (or Victoria Concert Hall), we hanged a left on Fullerton Road, down the underpass to the other side, past the Asian Civilisation Museum, kept along the Singapore River, where there was more water available and some cold yoghurt drinks and juice. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

You could tell some people were a little worried. It was a typical Singaporean worry:

“Eh, where is the dustbin?”

Fortunately, they were in plentiful reassuring-green supply. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

Under the white tentage, there were powerful fans, and pens and cards for condolences messages, and the opportunity to read some condolence boards until we got to the security scanners.

“No point spreading out, please keep to one line.”

“Tell your friends to keep all their metal objects in one bag.”

Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

Then into the Parliament House compound, where there was speculation amongst the crowd whom each SD car belonged to. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore

No photos inside, but not many were obeying the SILENCE sign. Suddenly, and very matter-of-factly, there was the casket drapped with the Singapore flag, and the vigil guard.

“Don’t stop, keep moving.”

Several people choked up. Many bowed as they wiped their tears (and sweat).

Then we were out, blinking in the sunshine. The priority queue was heading in as we exited.

Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, SingaporeAs one of my queue neighbours said, waiting in line was almost like a tour of what LKY had achieved for Singapore* – look at the greenery; look at the well-paved roads; look at the efficiency of the army and police; look at the cleanliness of the place – no globs of spit everywhere like in Beijing, no smell of urine or vomit like in London; look at the polite but again efficient security clearance; look at the buildings all around – office buildings full of workers driving the financial sector, shopping centers where a wide selection of goods are available to most of the population.

As George Yeo is reported to have said, quoting the epitaph of Christopher Wren in St. Paul’s Cathedral,”If you seek his memorial – look around you.”

*no he didn’t physically do the work, but as the leader, he set the vision, recruited the right people, drove them towards the goal. In the world, the leader is the one who is responsible for the group, the company, the country he leads. When Churchill led Britain to victory, Churchill wasn’t in a uniform with a gun, but the world credits the victory to him. In the same way, when a bank does dodgy deals, it is not usually the managing director who authorised or even had knowledge of the deals – but the world also holds him to account for them.

Good places to eat after the long queue to Parliament House (and talk more about LKY’s legacy and toast to his memory):

food court at Peninsula Shopping Centre

places to eat after Parliament House: food court at Peninsula Shopping Centre. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore places to eat after Parliament House: food court at Peninsula Shopping Centre. Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parliament House, Singapore Mourners queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew, lying in state at Parlia or just a few bus-stops down along Keong Saik Road:

big prawn hor fun at Kok Sen Restaurant (50 Keong Saik Road) Kok Sen Restaurant (50 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) Kok Sen Restaurant (50 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) Kok Sen Restaurant (50 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) big prawn hor fun, Kok Sen Restaurant (50 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) steamed kaya bread, crispy kaya toast, soft-boiled eggs, good strong tea at Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road) Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road, Singapore) good strong tea, soft-boiled eggs, steamed kaya bread, crispy kaya toast, Tong Ah Eating House (36 Keong Saik Road, Singapore)

On the Third Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

7-day Period of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew:

Last Day of National Mourning for Harry Lee Kuan Yew – State Funeral Procession

On the Sixth day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew, and the Wilful Blindness of Man

On the Fifth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Fourth Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Third Day of National Mourning: Long Snaking Queues to Pay Last Respects to Lee Kuan Yew

On the Third Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

On the Second Day of National Mourning for Lee Kuan Yew

Farewell and Good Night, Harry Lee Kuan Yew – 7 Reasons for Respecting LKY

On the third day of national mourning for Lee Kuan Yew, his casket was transferred from Sri Temasek to Parliament House by ceremonial gun carriage, where it will lie in state for the public to pay their respects until Saturday.

“The Coffin Bearer Party drapes the State Flag over Lee Kuan Yew’s casket. It is the highest State honour accorded to a leader and is positioned over the casket such that the crescent and stars lie over the head and close to Lee Kuan Yew’s heart.”

Coffin Bearer Party transfers the casket bearing ‎Lee Kuan Yew onto the Gun Carriage. The Coffin Bearer Party is led by BG Ong Tze-Ch’in, Commander 3 DIV, and comprises 8 officers from Army, Navy, Air Force and Police.

A foot procession follows the carriage carrying Mr Lee Kuan Yew from Sri Temasek for about 70m.

Singapore Armed Forces Band plays Beethoven Funeral March No 1 during foot procession, led by eldest son Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and wife Ho Ching. The elder Lee’s other children Wei Ling, Hsien Yang and wife Suet Fern, and grandchildren follow.

As ‎Lee Kuan Yew Carriage comes to a stop, a bag piper from Singapore Gurkha Contingent plays Auld Lang Syne. President Tony Tan, ESM Goh Chok Tong, among those at Istana Plaza to offer respects to Lee Kuan Yew.

At Istana main gate, 24 Ceremonial Guards from the SAFMPC have formed a line of honour.

The Gun Carriage for ‎Lee Kuan Yew enters into Parliament House. 8 pallbearers accompany the carriage, representing of 3 branches of government – legislature, executive, judiciary.

Lee Kuan Yew’s casket was received by Chief of Defence Force, Police Commissioner, Speaker of Parliament, PM Lee and family.”

Lee Kuan Yew’s Coffin Bearer Party has transferred the casket onto bier for lying in state at Parliament House. The public can pay last respects to Mr Lee Kuan Yew at Parliament House until Saturday evening.

(For information on the names of the pallbearers at the 8 pallbearers from the Istana Household and Mr. Lee’s Private Office, and the 8 receiving pallbearers representing the three branches of our government: the Executive, the Legislative and the Judiciary, see this page.)

You can see the Singaporean camera-salute outside the Istana and along Orchard Road in the 5th video. According to Facebook reports by onlookers were weeping openly and cheering and applauding. Amazing for “unemotional” Singaporeans. And definitely not stage-managed.

There were 3 queues to Parliament House this early afternoon that joined into one at some point:

  • from Hong Lim Park (yes, this is probably why the unrestricted use of the Speakers’ Corner was revoked, and unlikely to do with trying to clamp down on freedom of speech as Kenneth Jeyaratnam alleged); Screen Shot: Channel NewsAsia Singapore: aerial view of queue to pay last respects to Lee Kuan Yew in Hong Lim Park
  • from the Supreme Court, around the yet-unopened National Gallery of Singapore, past the Singapore Recreation Club, over Fullerton Bridge, past Fullerton Hotel, along the Singapore River (glad LKY got that cleaned up!), back across Cavenagh Bridge, past Asia Civilisation Museum;
  • from Clarke Quay, up the overhead bridge to Fort Canning, a little way up Fort Canning and down again, doubling back over the overhead bridge, down along the Singapore River, under the underpass, along New Bridge Road to Hong Lim Park.

It was good to enjoy our (rare?) show of unity and care for one another as the opportunity presented itself: Fullerton Hotel, Crazy Elephant and other restaurants along the way were offering complimentary iced water to everyone waiting under the hot sun.

Artisan de Fleurs at Raffles Place offered free flowers for mourners to take to LKY’s wake.

Rather like the gentle Singaporean humour about how the Guinness Book of Records should have them down for the longest queue. And also in a typical Singaporean way of solving this issue, Parliament House will be open for 24 hours daily until 28 March, 8pm.

screenshot: Remembering Lee Kuan Yew: Lying in State at Parliament House - Latest Info. Open 24 hours daily.