Keng Lye’s Resin Art at K+ Curatorial Space, Scotts Square, Singapore

Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts SquareAs part of my ongoing attempt to familiarise myself with a very-much-changed Singapore, I wandered into the K+ Curatorial Space (facebook) in Scotts Square (6 Scotts Road, Singapore) before a dinner meet-up.

It made my afternoon. There, under glass boxes, were pieces of resin art that were at once playful and awe-inducing.

Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Square

Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squareguppies and a goldfish? in takeaway plastic bags

Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Square Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squarekoi in beautiful containers, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squarea fighting fish in a glass bowl, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squarea whole school of orange fish, improbably, in a cardboard box, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squarelittle fish in an old leaf, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squareprawns – just look at his ability to portray translucency, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Square Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Square Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squareoctopii in crockery, Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Square Keng Lye's Resin Art at the K+ Gallery, Scotts Squareand the terrapin, fashioned with the help of Keng Lye’s children’s empty Kinder Surprise eggs.

Keng Lye‘s skill at rendering almost accurate simulacra of fish and seafood (oh, sorry, water creatures) was amazing enough. But the immense patience required to paint each layer before pouring more resin on and waiting 8 hours for it to dry before repeating the process, to create a 3-D effect, was almost beyond belief.

My favourite pieces were the octopus in a kopi cup, the small fish in the pointy leaf, and the single terrapin in a bowl. The price of this last one was S$7,500.

See also the layered resin paintings of Riusuke Fukahori, whom a friend had challenged Keng Lye to imitate.

Later at dinner, I rave to friends about this. “Oh, can he sculpt me a bowl of ah balling anot? One ball half-bitten with the peanut flowing out?” And they say Singaporeans lack inspiration.

*all photos were taken with the permission, nay the encouragement, of the curators

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